Tuesday, December 31, 2019

Chinese Dynastic Histories Translations (Early Medieval China)

Note:
This list is updated regularly. If you have any question or recommendation, please let me know. Thank you!

Recommended Readings:

Frankel, Hans H.C. Catalogue of translations from the Chinese dynastic histories for the period 220-960. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1957.

Bielenstein, Hans. "The Six Dynasties," Vol. I,  BMFEA 68 (1996):5-324; Vol. II, BMFEA 69 (1997):5-246. 

Swartz, Wendy, Campany Robert Ford, Lu Yang, and Choo Jessey Jiun-Chyi, eds. Early Medieval China: A Sourcebook. New York: Columbia University Press, 2014.

Wilkinson, Endymion. Chinese History: A New Manual. 2017. (check the chapter "Wei Jin Nanbeichao")

三國志


魏書
v.1 武帝紀 (曹操)
*cf de Crespigny, Rafe, trans. Imperial Warlord: A Biography of Cao Cao 155-220 AD.  Leiden; Boston: Brill, 2010.

v.5 后妃傳
Cutter, Robert Joe and William Crowell, trans. Empresses and consorts: selections from Chen Shou's Records of the Three States with Pei Songzhi's commentary. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, 1999.

v.29 方伎傳
管輅、朱建平、周宣、華佗
DeWoskin, Kenneth J., trans. Doctors, Diviners, and Magicians of Ancient China: Biographies of Fang-shih. New York: Columbia University Press, 1983.

蜀書 
v.9 董和、劉巴、馬良、陳震、董允、呂乂
by William Crowell
https://www.academia.edu/5318635/Sanguo_zhi_39_Shu_9_Biographies_of_Dong_He_Liu_Ba_Ma_Liang_Chen_Zhen_Dong_Yun_and_L%C3%BC_Yi

v.34 二主妃子傳 
Cutter, Robert Joe and William Crowell, trans. Empresses and consorts: selections from Chen Shou's Records of the Three States with Pei Songzhi's commentary. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, 1999.

v.42 譙周
Farmer, J. Michael. "Sanguo Zhi Fascicle 42: The Biography of Qiao Zhou." Early Medieval China, no. 23 (2017): 22-41.

吳書
v.46 孫堅
de Crespigny, Rafe, trans. The Biography of Sun Chien.  Canberra: Centre of Oriental Studies, Australian National University, 1966.

v.50 妃嬪傳

Cutter, Robert Joe and William Crowell, trans. Empresses and consorts: selections from Chen Shou's Records of the Three States with Pei Songzhi's commentary. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, 1999.

* also cf Fang, Achilles, trans. The Chronicle of the Three Kingdoms  (220–265): Chapters 69–78 from the Tzu chih t’ung chien of Ssu-ma Kuang  (1019–1086). 2 vols. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1952–1965.

晉書

晉書 v.1 司馬懿
Fairbank, Anthony Bruce. "Ssu-Ma I (179-251): Wei Statesman and Chin Founder: An Historiographical Inquiry." PhD diss., University of Washington, 1994. (Chapter 6)

晉書 v.11-13 天文志
Ho, Peng Yoke. The Astronomical Chapters of the Chin Shu, with Amendments, Full Translation, and Annotations.  Paris: Mouton, 1966.

晉書 v.26 食貨志
Yang, Liansheng. "Notes on the Economic History of the Chin Dynasty." Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies 9, no. 2 (1946): 107-85.

晉書 v.36 張華
Straughair, Anna. Chang Hua: A Statesman-Poet of the Western Chin Dynasty.  Canberra: Australian National University, Faculty of Asian Studies, 1973.

晉書 v.47 傅玄
Paper, Jordan D. The Fu-Tzu: A Post-Han Confucian Text.  Leiden; New York: E.J. Brill, 1987.

晉書 v.54 陸雲
Wu, Sujane. "The Biography of Lu Yun (262-303) in Jin Shu 54." Early Medieval China, no. 1 (2001): 1-38.

晉書 v.65 王導
cf Wells, Matthew V. "From Spirited Youth to Loyal Official: Life Writing and Didacticism in the Jin Shu Biography of Wang Dao." Early Medieval China 21 (2015): 3-20.

晉書 v.82
習鑿齒
Chittick, Andrew. "Pride of Place: The Advent of Local History in Early Medieval China.” PhD diss., University of Michigan, 1997. (pp.220-230)

晉書 v.92 
顧愷之
Chen, Shih-hsiang. Biography of Ku K'ai-Chih. (Chin Shu 92.21a-22a).  Berkeley: University of California Press, 1961.

王沉
Declercq, Dominik. Writing against the State: Political Rhetorics in Third and Fourth Century China.  Leiden; Boston: Brill, 1998. (pp.152-158)

晉書 v.95 藝術
戴洋
DeWoskin, Kenneth J. Doctors, Diviners, and Magicians of Ancient China: Biographies of Fang-Shih.  New York: Columbia University Press, 1983.

晉書 v.96 
謝道韞
CHENNAULT, CYNTHIA LOUISE, "An Annotated Translation of the Biography of Hsieh Tao-yun" (Master's thesis)

晉書 v.97 吐谷渾
Carroll, Thomas D. Account of the T'ù-Yü-Hún in the History of the Chïn Dynasty.  Berkeley-Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1953.

晉書 v.101 劉淵
Honey, David B. The Rise of the Medieval Hsiung-Nu: The Biography of Liu Yüan. Bloomington, Ind.: Research Institute for Inner Asian Studies, 1990.

晉書 v.113-114 苻堅
Rogers, Michael C. The rise of the Former Ch'in state and its spread under Fu Chien, through 370 A.D. based on Chin shu 113. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1953.

Rogers, Michael C. The chronicle of Fu Chien: a case of exemplar history. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1968.

晉書 v.120-121 李特 李流 李雄 李班 李期 李壽 李勢
Kleeman, Terry F. Great Perfection: Religion and Ethnicity in a Chinese Millennial Kingdom.  Honolulu: University of Hawai`i Press, 1998.

晉書 v.122 呂光
Mather, Richard B. Biography of Lü Kuang.  Berkeley: University of California Press, 1959.

宋書

宋書 v.51 宗室
劉義慶
Zhang, Zhenjun. "Observations on the Life and Works of Liu Yiqing". Early Medieval China. 2014 (20): 83-104.

宋書 v.59 張暢
Dien, Albert. "The Disputation at Pengcheng: Accounts from the Wei Shu and the Song Shu." In Early Medieval China: A Sourcebook, edited by Wendy Swartz, Campany Robert Ford, Lu Yang and Choo Jessey Jiun-Chyi, 32-59. New York: Columbia University Press, 2014.

宋書 v.69 范曄
cf Eicher, Sebastian. "Fan Ye's Biography in the Song Shu: Form, Content, and Impact." Early Medieval China 22 (2016): 45-64.

宋書 v.91 孝義
郭世道; 郭原平
Knapp, Keith N. "Exemplary Everymen: Guo Shidao and Guo Yuanping as Confucian Commoners." Asia Major 23, no. 1 (2010): 87-125.

魏書

魏書 v.1 序記
Holmgren, Jennifer. Annals of Tai: Early T'o-pa History; an Annotated Translation of Chapter 1 of Wei Shu. Canberra: The Australian National University, 1982. 
https://openresearch-repository.anu.edu.au/handle/1885/115004?mode=full

魏書 v.13 皇后列傳
 序 Preface
 Balkwill, Stephanie Lynn. "Empresses, Bhikṣuṇīs, and Women of Pure Faith: Buddhism and the Politics of Patronage in the Northern Wei." PhD diss., McMaster University, 2015. (pp.347-350)

 神元皇后竇氏-高宗乳母常氏
 Holmgren, Jennifer. 1979. "Women's biographies in the Wei-shu." Ph.D., Australian National University.

 文明太后
 Balkwill, Stephanie Lynn. "Empresses, Bhikṣuṇīs, and Women of Pure Faith: Buddhism and the Politics of Patronage in the Northern Wei." PhD diss., McMaster University, 2015. (pp.351-360)

 Holmgren, Jennifer. 1979. "Women's biographies in the Wei-shu." Ph. D., Australian National University. (pp.304-311)

 文成元皇后李氏-宣武皇后高氏
 Holmgren, Jennifer. 1979. "Women's biographies in the Wei-shu." Ph. D., Australian National University. (pp.311-329)

 靈太后
 Holmgren, Jennifer. "Empress Dowager Ling of the Northern Wei and the T'o-Pa Sinicization Question." Papers in Far Eastern History 18 (1978): 160–70.

魏書 v.37 司馬楚之
Lim, Lucy. "The Northern Wei Tomb of Ssu-Ma Chin-Lung and Early Chinese Figure Painting." PhD diss., New York University, 1990. (pp.178-188)

魏書 v.53 李孝伯
Dien, Albert. "The Disputation at Pengcheng: Accounts from the Wei Shu and the Song Shu." In Early Medieval China: A Sourcebook, edited by Wendy Swartz, Campany Robert Ford, Lu Yang and Choo Jessey Jiun-Chyi, 32-59. New York: Columbia University Press, 2014.

魏書 v.92 列女傳
cf Holmgren, Jennifer. 1979. "Women's Biographies in the Wei-shu: A Study of the Moral Attitudes and Social Background Found in Women's Biographies in the Dynastic History of the Northern Wei." Ph.D., Australian National University.

cf Holmgren, Jennifer. 1981. "Widow Chastity in the Northern Dynasties: The Lieh-nü Biographies in the Wei-shu." Papers on Far Eastern History 23:165–186.

魏書 v.105 天象志
cf Xu, Zhentao, David W. Pankenier, Yaotiao Jiang, and Institute Earth Space. East Asian Archaeoastronomy: Historical Records of Astronomical Observations of China, Japan and Korea.

魏書 v.111 食貨志
Blue, Rhea C. "The Argumentation of the Shih-Huo Chih: Chapters of the Han, Wei, and Sui Dynastic Histories." Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies 11, no. 1-2 (1948): 70-75.

魏書 v.114 釋老志
Hurvitz, Leon, trans. Treatise on Buddhism and Taoism, an English Translation of the Original Chinese Text of Wei-Shu Cxiv and the Japanese Annotation of Tsukamoto Zenryu. Kyoto: Jimbunkagaku kenkyujo, Kyoto University.

Ware, James R. "The Wei Shu and the Sui Shu on Taoism." Journal of the American Oriental Society 53, no. 3 (1933): 215-50.

北齊書

北齊書 v.37 魏收
Jamieson, John Charles. "The Biography of Wei Shou.” Mater’s thesis, University of California, Berkeley, 1964.

北齊書 v.45 顏之推
Dien, Albert E. Pei Ch'ishu 45: Biography of Yen Chih-T'ui.  Bern: Herbert Lang, 1976.

周書

周書 v.11 宇文護
Dien, Albert E. Biography of Yu-wen Hu. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1962.

周書 v.23 蘇綽
Goodrich, Chauncey Shafter. Biography of Su Ch'o.  Berkeley: University of California Press, 1961.

周書 v. 50 異域下
Miller, Roy Andrew. Accounts of Western Nations in the History of the Northern Chou Dynasty [Zhou Shu 50. 10b-17b] Berkeley: University of California Press, 1959.

突厥
Parker E.H. "The Early Turks (From the CHOU SHU)." The China Review. 1899. Vol. 24. No.3.

北史

北史 v.13 文明太后
Gibson, Wenley Archibald. "The Grand Empress Dowager Wen Ming and the Northern Wei Necropolis at Fang Shan." Freer Gallery of Art Occasional Papers 1, no. 1 (1947).

北史 v.99 
突厥
Parker E.H. "The Early Turks (From the PEI SHI and the SUI SHU).” The China Review. 1900. Vol. 24. No. 4.

Parker E.H. "The Early Turks - Part II (From the PEI SHI).” The China Review. 1900. Vol. 25. No. 1.

隋書

隋書 v.24 食貨志
Blue, Rhea C. "The Argumentation of the Shih-Huo Chih: Chapters of the Han, Wei, and Sui Dynastic Histories." harvjasiastud Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies 11, no. 1-2 (1948): 76-89.

隋書 v.35 經籍志
道經
Ware, James R. "The Wei Shu and the Sui Shu on Taoism." Journal of the American Oriental Society 53, no. 3 (1933): 243-50.

隋書 v.58 魏澹
Dien, Albert E. "Wei Tan and the Historiography of the Wei Shu." In Studies in Early Medieval Chinese Literature and Cultural History: In Honor of Richard B. Mather and Donald Holzman. Provo, Utah: Tʻang Studies Society, 2003.

隋書 v.84 北狄
突厥
Parker E.H. "The Early Turks (From the PEI SHI and the SUI SHU).” The China Review. 1900. Vol. 24. No. 4.

Monday, March 18, 2019

Heaven Is Empty: A Cross-Cultural Approach to "Religion" and Empire in Ancient China

Author:
Filippo Marsili

Publication date:
December, 2018

Publisher: 
SUNY Press





Abstract:

Heaven Is Empty offers a new comparative perspective on the role of the sacred in the formation of China’s early empires (221 BCE–9 CE) and shows how the unification of the Central States was possible without a unitary and universalistic conception of religion. The cohesive function of the ancient Mediterranean cult of the divinized ruler was crucial for the legitimization of Rome’s empire across geographical and social boundaries. Eventually reelaborated in Christian terms, it came to embody the timelessness and universality of Western conceptions of legitimate authority, while representing an analytical template for studying other ancient empires. Filippo Marsili challenges such approaches in his examination of the reign of Emperor Wu of the Han (141–87 BCE). Wu purposely drew from regional traditions and tried to gain the support of local communities through his patronage of local cults. He was interested in rituals that envisioned the monarch as a military leader, who directly controlled the land and its resources, as a means for legitimizing radical administrative and economic centralization. In reconstructing this imperial model, Marsilire interprets fragmentary official accounts in light of material evidence and noncanonical and recently excavated texts. In bringing to life the courts, battlefields, markets, shrines, and pleasure quarters of early imperial China, Heaven Is Empty provides a postmodern and postcolonial reassessment of “religion” before the arrival of Buddhism and challenges the application of Greco-Roman and Abrahamic systemic, identitary, and exclusionary notions of the “sacred” to the analysis of pre-Christian and non-Western realities.

Table of Contents:

Introduction: An Empire without a “Religion”

1. Readings of the “Sacred”: Chinese Religion, Chinese Religions, and Religions in China

2. Writing the Empire: Ex Pluribus Plurima

3. Narrating the Empire: Metaphysics without God, “Religions” without Identity

4. Time, Myth, and Memory: Of Water, Metal, and Cinnabar

5. Place and Ritual: From Templum to Text

Conclusions: The Importance of Getting Lost

Friday, March 15, 2019

Cultural interactions during the Zhou Period (c. 1000-350 BC): A Study of Networks from the Suizao Corridor

Author:
Beichen Chen

Publisher: 
Archaeopress Archaeology

Publication date:
February 28, 2019




Abstract:

Cultural Interactions during the Zhou Period (c. 1000-350 BC): A study of networks from the Suizao corridor’ examines cultural interactions during the Zhou period of China (c. 1000- 350 BCE) between the Suizao corridor (near the present-day Yangtze River region) and its contemporaries within or outside the Zhou realm. It concentrates mainly, but not exclusively, on bronze ritual vessels from the Suizao corridor, and discusses the underlying social and political relations between the dominant cultures and the regional ones in this particular area (the Zeng state for example), which are central to understanding the ways in which the dominant cultures joined their disparate territories into a whole. Newly excavated archaeological evidence show that there were at least three periods when people in the corridor learned about the current traditions employed elsewhere, which are: 1) Yejiashan period (from the 11th to the 10th century BCE); 2) post-Ritual Reform period (from the mid-9th to the mid-7th century BCE); and 3) Marquis Yi’s period (from the mid- 6th to the mid-4th century BCE). In these periods, local people were involved in networks of enormous and constantly changing complexity, in which people, objects, practices, and ideas were mixed together through inter-regional contacts. The choices of local people in adopting foreign materials and ideas from either the dominant cultures or other places depended heavily on the subjective view of their social identity, which can be constructed, maintained, or transited to adapt to different social and political environments.

Table of Contents:

Chapter One: Introduction

Chapter Two: Yejiashan Period

Chapter Three: Post-Ritual Reform Period

Chapter Four: Marquis Yi’s Period

Chapter Five: Conclusion

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

[Dissertation] Isotopic Analysis of Dietary Patterns in Northern China from the Proto-Shang Period to the Qin Dynasty

Author:
MA, Ying

Defended:
2017

School:
Leiden University

Abstract:

The stable isotope ratios of carbon (d13C), nitrogen (d15N) and sulphur (d34S) are measured to examine human diet, social stratification, mobility and animal husbandry practices. Three locations comprising four sites from the Yellow River Valleys of north China are investigated: Nancheng (Hebei Province), Xishan (Gansu Province), Liyi and Shanren (Shaanxi Province), and this work represents one of the largest and most detailed isotopic research projects ever conducted in China. This thesis focused on time periods and cultures that were previously underrepresented, in the literature such as the early Bronze/Iron Ages to the Qin Dynasty (221-206 BC). Further, this thesis found new evidence concerning dietary patterns, social stratification (or lack thereof), animal husbandry practices and human mobility during these formative pre-Qin Empire periods.

Table of Contents:

Chapter 1 – Introduction 

Chapter 2 – Paleodiet Reconstruction and Stable Isotope Ratio Analysis

Chapter 3 – Introduction to the Cultural Prehistory and History of China

Chapter 4 – Isotopic Perspectives (d13C, d15N, d34S) of Diet, Social Complexity, and Animal Husbandry during the Proto-Shang Period (ca. 2000 – 1600 BC) of China

Chapter 5 – Reconstructing Diet of the Early Qin (ca. 700 – 400 BC) at Xishan, Gansu Province, China (Article published in International Journal of
Osteoarchaeology)

Chapter 6 – Tracing the Locality of Prisoners and Workers at the Mausoleum of Qin Shi Huang: First Emperor of China (259-210 BC) 

Chapter 7 – Conclusions and Future Work

Tuesday, March 12, 2019

Mind and Body in Early China: Beyond Orientalism and the Myth of Holism

Author:
Edward Slingerland

Publisher:
New York, NY : Oxford University Press

Publication date:
December 2018



Abstract:

Mind and Body in Early China critiques Orientalist accounts of early China as the radical, "holistic" other. The idea that the early Chinese held the "strong" holist view, seeing no qualitative difference between mind and body, has long been contradicted by traditional archeological and qualitative textual evidence. New digital humanities methods, along with basic knowledge about human cognition, now make this position untenable. A large body of empirical evidence suggests that "weak" mind-body dualism is a psychological universal, and that human sociality would be fundamentally impossible without it.

Edward Slingerland argues that the humanities need to move beyond social constructivist views of culture, and embrace instead a view of human cognition and culture that integrates the sciences and the humanities. Our interpretation of texts and artifacts from the past and from other cultures should be constrained by what we know about the species-specific, embodied commonalities shared by all humans. This book also attempts to broaden the scope of humanistic methodologies by employing team-based qualitative coding and computer-aided "distant reading" of texts, while also drawing upon our current best understanding of human cognition to transform our basic starting point. It has implications for anyone interested in comparative religion, early China, cultural studies, digital humanities, or science-humanities integration.

Table of Contents:

Introduction

Chapter One: The Myth of Holism in Early China

PART I: Qualitative Approaches to Concepts of Mind and Body

Chapter Two: Soul and Body: Traditional Archeological and Textual Evidence for Soul-Body Dualism

Chapter Three: Mind-Body Dualism in the Textual Record

PART II: Quantitative Approaches to Concepts of Mind and Body

Chapter Four: Embracing the Digital Humanities: New Methods for Analyzing Texts and Sharing Scholarly Knowledge

PART III: Methodological Issues in the Interpretation of Textual Corpora

Chapter Five: Hermeneutical Constraints: Minds in Our Bodies and Our Feet on the Ground

Chapter Six: Hermeneutical Excesses: Interpretive Missteps and the Essentialist Trap

Conclusion: Naturalistic Hermeneutics and the End of Orientalism

Friday, March 8, 2019

Early Chinese Jades in the Harvard Art Museums

Author:
Jenny F. So

Publication date:
February 2019

Publisher:
Published by Harvard Art Museums
Distributed by Yale University Press


Abstract:
Jade has long played a major role in Chinese social, cultural, and political life. From personal ornamentation to funerary practice, from palace decoration to private devotion, this exquisite material has been revered by commoners and rulers alike. This book charts that vast story, beginning with an in-depth exploration of the stone itself—its unique material qualities and the challenges they raise for workmanship—and then moving chronologically to reveal exactly how jade developed its special moral, ritual, and political significance over millennia in China. The book draws particular attention to the peoples and the communities who quarried and worked the material, passing on their knowledge in a tradition that now spans Neolithic times to the present day.

This sweeping narrative is told in part through high-quality examples selected from Harvard’s Grenville L. Winthrop Collection, which includes some of the finest examples of ancient or archaizing jades outside China. The volume highlights around one hundred of these jades, carefully chosen for the ways in which they help advance the broader historical narrative the book provides. Interwoven through the book’s main chapters, the Winthrop objects are further explored through engaging catalogue entries that detail the latest available information based on conservation analysis and archaeological finds.